Michael Wolf

Detroit, MI from ANAP by Doug Rickard

What photographers do is take the real stuff of the world and edit it down, noticing, choosing, pointing, framing, removing something from one context and placing in another, hopefully transforming it in one way or another. What if there is a second camera directly involved, or nine? Google Earth and Street View are adding another layer to the way we can interact with our environment, all from the comfort of our home computers or our iPhones. We can fly around the world in an instant, see the activity along roadsides and curbsides from Kalamazoo to Kishniev. If photography itself is really a form of editing, does it matter that the initial camera operator is not the artist himself, but a spooky, indiscriminate Google car thousands of miles away, connected by satellite and signal? Does authorship even matter, or is the anonymous, motor-driven nature of this image collecting an interesting conceptual layer? Anonymous people shot by an anonymous camera.

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"A Series of Unfortunate Events #57" by Michael Wolf, from the "Street Views" se

The proliferation of lens-based mechanisms developed since the turn of the century has added to the possibilities of visual communication and, more contentiously, voyeurism and surveillance. Through devices such as cell phone cameras and online webcams, the world has become more visually connected—and exposed. In response, many artists are now exploiting such technology to help facilitate their artwork. German photographer Michael Wolf (b.

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Photograph by Michael Wolf, from the portfolio, 'Copy Artists in China' appearing in Daylight Magazine issue #5

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Issue #5, Global Commodities

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Featuring portfolios by: Adam Broomberg, Oliver Chanarin, Ali Chraibi, Kadir van Lohuizen, Ivor Prickett, Heidi Schumann, Allan Sekula, elin o’Hara slavick, Ian Teh, Heinrich Voelkel, and Michael Wolf.

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