Lisa Kereszi

Detroit, MI from ANAP by Doug Rickard

What photographers do is take the real stuff of the world and edit it down, noticing, choosing, pointing, framing, removing something from one context and placing in another, hopefully transforming it in one way or another. What if there is a second camera directly involved, or nine? Google Earth and Street View are adding another layer to the way we can interact with our environment, all from the comfort of our home computers or our iPhones. We can fly around the world in an instant, see the activity along roadsides and curbsides from Kalamazoo to Kishniev. If photography itself is really a form of editing, does it matter that the initial camera operator is not the artist himself, but a spooky, indiscriminate Google car thousands of miles away, connected by satellite and signal? Does authorship even matter, or is the anonymous, motor-driven nature of this image collecting an interesting conceptual layer? Anonymous people shot by an anonymous camera.

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august sander

I like to collect things. As a teacher of (and also as a life-long student of) photography, I am always looking for articles, essays, interviews about my chosen medium. At one time, rarer pieces were hard to find - maybe in the bottom of a desk drawer in Xerox form, maybe in an old folder of readings I kept from college, acquired from barter and exchange w/ other teachers, or from just hunkering down at the copy machine in a good arts library. I have physical files and virtual folders of all the images and articles I come across that strike me as worth saving, for one reason or another. They contain articles about my favorite photographers, pictures torn from magazines, future (and past) readings for my classes. The internet has changed everything, though, with its encyclopedic, searchable base of knowledge.

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Funny Face at Coney Island by E.E. Rutter

On January 27, 2001, "Nickel Empire: Coney Island Photographs 1898-1948" opened to the public at Schroeder, Romero and Shredder (somewhat of a scary name for a dealer in works on paper.) The photographer E.E. Rutter is featured, as this image of George C. Tilyou’s famous Funny Face is on view. The exhibition of  photos is supplemented with a charred wooden horse from the Steeplechase ride that survived one of the park’s infamous fires.

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Photograph by Maude Schuyler Clay

According to Artinfo, via Huffington Post, a promise to color photography has been made in the form of the William Eggleston Museum in Memphis, Tenn.: "Preparation for the new institution has been spearheaded by New York-based intellectual property lawyer Mark Crosby, who rallied a group of philanthropists around the idea. Crosby has already raised $5 million in pledged start-up funds. "They're not creative types, or even fans of Eggleston especially," Crosby told the Commercial Appeal of the anonymous donors, "but they're Memphians who have a public mission." The museum is expected to open in 2013, in one of three midtown Memphis sites: Overton Park, Overton Square, or the Crosstown neighborhood.

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Snowblind , Copyright Pam Pecchio 2010

On Longing, Distance and Heavy Metal Daniel Cooney Fine Art 511 W 25th St Suite 506, New York, NY January 6 - February 12, 201 and Southern Views University of Virginia Art Museum January 14 - June 5, 2011 Final Friday opening receptions: January 28, February 25, March 25 & April 29, 5:30-7:30pm Links: http://www.danielcooneyfineart.com

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Lee Friedlander Garry Winogrand 1957 © Lee Friedlander

The great street photographer Garry Winogrand was born on this day, January 14th, in 1928, in NYC. Happy Birthday, Garry Winogrand! See the exhibition "Women are Beautiful," opening this Monday the 17th at the Emerson Gallery at Hamilton College in Upstate New York Through April 3, 2011 at 198 College Hill Road Clinton, NY 13323 "In 1975 Winogrand published Women are Beautiful, a book of eighty-five photographs of women. The images, culled from hundreds, are candid shots of anonymous women on streets, at social gatherings, marching in protest, and generally going about their daily lives. Winogrand wrote: “Whenever I’ve seen an attractive woman, I’ve done my best to photograph her. I don’t know if all the women in the photographs are beautiful, but I do know that the women are beautiful in the photographs.

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image from American Power series, copyright Mitch Epstein

On January 14th at 7pm, Mitch Epstein and Susan Bell will speak about their not-for-profit project "What is American Power?", a new billboard and website campaign launched in the spring of 2010 that encourages responsible energy production and consumption. The lecture is presented in conjunction with the opening exhibition "People, Places, Power: Reframing the American Landscape," which is open January 14 through February 25, 2011. Davidson College in North Carolina presents the exhibition, which "focuses on the complex interplay between personal, social, political, and economic forces in rural and urban America. Among the various themes within the exhibition, attention will be focused on the necessary yet uneasy relationship that exists between power utilities and the public they serve.

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Kodachrome t-shirt from Dwayne's Photo

December 30, 2010 marks the last day any Kodachrome film, which was retired last year, will be processed anywhere, ever. The last stand was at Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kansas. The facilities will be dismantled and sold for scrap. Who knows? Maybe a bit of it will end up as a screw in an M9 or a 5D someday... If you missed the developing deadline, it's not too late to get a commemorative t-shirt. Only $12.95! RIP Kodachrome: 1935-2010 http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/

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Swimming Hole Salesman - Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust-Norman Rockwell Li

The wonderful show "Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera" has made its way to New York City, via Brooklyn. Of course, it's not a secret that painters and illustrators often use source photographs for their work, but how may of them make those elaborate photographs in a studio set with full lighting, casting and a camera crew? (This is all before the likes of Crewdson, Sherman, Simmons and Wall.) The pictures can stand alone, though they are presented in this exhibition with the painted pieces they ended up becoming. The images remind one of staged Americana in early television, advertising and Speed Graphic new photos of the 50's. A favorite moment is when it is revealed that a person walking was really just one standing still, but with a book propped under part of the foot. Another is when a lively ponytail is held up, not by it's own springy-ness, but by a cute assistant's hand.

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Wojnarowicz as Rimbaud in NYC

Kudos to NYC's New Museum of Contemporary Art for a last-minute addition to their Winter schedule. In the lobby of the Bowery art space through January 23, 2011 will be the now controversial video "A Fire in my Belly" that was unceremoniously, suddenly removed from view at the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. David Wojnarowicz was an artist who used photography and film, and who died of AIDS in 1992. A watered-down 4 minute cut of the original 1987 video was on display and outraged a conservative religious group, the Catholic League, led by Bill Donohue, who threatened the NPG until they relented and censored the piece.

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