Jeff Whetstone

Jeff Whetstone's connection to the land, love of history and susceptibility to romance brand him along with other great photographers-especially the sons and daughters of the South. 

The first time that I saw this image, I was spellbound. Listed on his website under the heading Human, this image defies being fully identified.The viewer's gaze is interrupted by only having access to the back of the sitter. 

What we do know comes from the barrel of the gun to the left, the plaid covered arm on the right and that enveloping hair that glistens and shields (to the point of camouflaging) the sitter's body. This, along with Whetstone's characteristic naturalistic vista creates an image (and narrative) that is at once classic and defiant similarly to that of Lorna Simpson's Waterbearer (1986) seen below. Both subjects reflect on female workers in art history-mainly those in the paintings of Vermeer.

 

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Photograph by Jeff Wetstone, from a series of images dealing with the relationship between humans and nature appearing in Daylight Magazine issue #3.

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Issue #3, Sustainability

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Featuring portfolios by: David Maisel, Edgar Martins, Leonie Purchas, Joel Sternfeld, Bo Thomassen, and Jeff Whetstone In exploring issues of “Sustainability,” this edition of Daylight suggests that the dualistic representation of humans and nature can change, and that documentary photography’s role in this transformation can range in scope from the immense landscape—as seen in David Maisel’s stunning aerials of a breathing, living Los Angeles; to the intimate images of people embodying lifestyles of low environmental and economic impact, as seen through the work Joel Sternfeld and Leonie Purchas; to the Daylight-initiated self-representative documentary work of domestic renewable fuel producers.

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