Chris Wiley

 

 

This blog series is created by choosing a photograph by a photographer who's work I greatly appreciate, that photographer picks a photograph by another photographer, that photographer picks a photograph by another photographer, and so on until a chain of five photographs have been created. 

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Daylight Multimedia Podcast - Joel Sternfeld: iDubai

We are proud to feature a portfolio of images from Joel Sternfeld's recent book iDubai. In iDubai, Sternfeld captured photographs of Dubai's lavish shopping malls with his iPhone camera. Featuring commentary by Chris Wiley, iDubai marries form and content in its incisive critique on conspicuous consumption.

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Beginning at 8pm on July 31st, Lucas Blalock will be signing copies of his self-published book I Believe You, Liar at Eighth Veil in Los Angeles.

Like the book’s opening image of a woman caught open mouthed, mid-sentence, Blalock’s photographs speak in a manner that seems to disclose as much as it withholds—they are semaphores without sense, smoke signals sent at the hour before dawn. Together, they make for a hallucinatory gem of a book, which seems to be structured according to the logic of dreams.

Here’s the “publisher’s description”:

 

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Paul Graham's past work has often existed in liminal spaces-between the documentary and the subjective, the picturesque and the political, the moment and the metonym. His recent series, a shimmer of possibility, which is on view at the Museum of Modern Art until May 18, takes a similar tack, this time attempting to chisel out a space between photography and cinema. This, of course, is an interstice that has been contentious since the Lumière brothers first spooled celluloid past a shutter, but it has been particularly well trodden-at least on the photographic side of the aisle-over the past quarter-century, spurred on by the single-frame cinema of artists like Jeff Wall, Gregory Crewdson, and Philip Lorca-diCorcia.

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LaToya Ruby Frazier has worked for the last seven years unflinchingly documenting her relationship with her family, with a particular focus on her often difficult, yet loving relationship with her mother. The resulting photographic and video works are redolent, in both content and style, of the direct cinema of filmmakers like Frederick Weisman and Albert and David Maysles and the concerned photojournalism of Mary Ellen Mark and Eugene Richards. However, unlike her predecessors, Frazier makes a virtue of subjectivity, rather than attempting to exorcize it. She invites the viewer into her world, portraying the struggles of poverty, drug addiction, and male absence in the contemporary black family from the inside out.

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In Eugene Von Bruenchenhein's ramshackle suburban home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, there hung a hand-incised metal plaque proclaiming his multifaceted identity:

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein
Freelance Artist
Poet and Sculptor
Inovator 
Arrow maker and Plant man
Bone artifacts constructor
Photographer and Architect
Philosopher.

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Considering its themes--the ethnographic gaze, colonialist knowledge/power systems, the ineluctable battle between culture and nature--Lothar Baumgarten's show at Marian Goodman Gallery would seem to have no right to be beautiful. Almost as a rule, when one confronts this kind of exhibition it is wise to gird oneself against a coming onslaught of boring work bolstered by dry, grinding pedantry or (worse) boring work justified by way of obfuscatory warblings lifted from a litany of fashionable "post-"s (structuralism, modernism, colonialism, feminism, etc.). Nevertheless, Baumgarten's show is subtle, considered, and ravishing.

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Luciana Lamothe is a criminal. Born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she stalks the streets of her home city, making mischief and sowing mayhem at all hours of the day and night: overturned potted plants; the doorbells of whole apartment blocks rung incessantly; padlocks added onto chains, necessitating bolt cutters; chairs deconstructed in swanky lobbies; cans of paint spilled. What (perhaps) makes Lamothe different then your run-of-the-mill petty criminal is that she positions her acts of vandalism as urban interventions, designed to rearrange, reimagine, and generally shake up urban space. Also, she takes pictures.

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Stan VanDerBeek was once a major figure of the New York avant-guard. He associated with luminaries like Claes Oldenburg, Jim Dine, Robert Morris, Allan Kaprow, and Yvonne Rainer, showed at major museums, participated in international art events, and worked as an artist-in-residence at NASA and M.I.T. In 1977, he was the subject of a retrospective at the Anthology Film Archives. But, since his death in 1984 at the age of 57, he has been largely forgotten.

From A La Mode (1958), Photomontage on Board

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Leigh Ledare's solo show at Rivington Arms (which was at Andrew Roth Gallery in a different permutation earlier this year) is comprised of photographs, video and mixed media works that are mostly related to his unusual family life. Taken from the accompanying monograph Pretend You’re Actually Alive, the Oedipally-charged work in You Are Nothing to Me. You Are Like Air. largely focuses on depictions of the artist’s mother, a ballerina turned stripper. She often appears before Ledare's lens in various states of undress, sometimes even in bed or in flagrante delicto with one of her significantly younger lovers (though never, it should be noted, with Ledare himself). Also included is a selection of somewhat less prurient self-portraits that the Ledare has produced in collaboration with older women that he has found through their personal ads.

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